Posts Tagged ‘insight’

Financial Time’s Gillian Tett Hits another One Out of the Park!

Friday, March 20th, 2009

As I said, I am in love with this woman’s mind.  Her writing is impeccable.  Her mastery of the English language undeniable and her Insight is excellent.  The first two paragraphs of her column today, Friday March 20 are very insightful.  However, I must admit I don’t know what “market makers” are.

 

Let me sum those paragraphs up:

 

‘While the politicians on both sides of the Atlantic have vowed to clamp down on “greedy” speculators and go after those engaged in “unbridled risk-taking” . . . the “disappearance of risk capital” is a key reason so much of the financial machinery is failing to work.’

 

Think about that.

 

Because we are fixated on pursing anyone or any organization which takes risks and appears greedy, we have chased all the players out the market because there is nothing to gain and much to lose.

 

In ball playing terms: Because the politicians keep changing the rules of the game, the investors who take the risks have taken their ball and gone home.  Who can blame them?

 

Tett’s Insight column is an another indicator that the governments on both sides of the Atlantic need to get out of the way and let the markets function as they should—those who lose should be allowed to fail; however, those who succeed should be allowed to reap the rewards of their efforts and their risk taking.

 

While Obama and his minions keep changing the rules of the game, the Obama Administration is having one effect: 

 

It is keeping everything unstable.

And, IMO, this appears “purposeful.”

 

In other words,

 

The Obama Administration is creating instability on purpose,

 

With a reason.

 

And it is not a good reason.

 

One piece of evidence that this instability is intentional is the fact that the US Congress, Senate and President knew about AIG’s contractual obligations to pay bonuses.  How do I come to that conclusion you ask?  Simple.  Senator Dodd added wording that exempted “contractually obligated bonuses” into the Bail Out Legislation.

 

These political folks keep playing both sides against the middle, against us.  And it’s got to stop.  Otherwise, they are going to destroy everything.  If they can tax those bonuses out of existence, they can tax any of us off the map.  In fact, let me step out and say that this is exactly what God wants.

 

Wake up, America!

 

You, we are the target.

Gillian Tett, Insight: Time to expose those CDOs

Friday, February 27th, 2009

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2970532c-0421-11de-8, triple A assests45b-000077b07658.html?nclick_check=1

Folks, I have mentioned on air long ago that I’m “in love” with Gillian Tett.  This woman’s mind is captivating.  She is by far the best writer the Financial Times has.  Certainly, she is more conservative and Gillian Tett’s insight is impeccable!

Moreover, Miss Tett is right.  She is absolutely correct:  THE HUGE HOLES THAT HAVE BEEN BLASTED IN THE BALANCE SHEETS OF THE BANKS HAVE NOT BEEN BASED ON ANY REAL MARKET NUMBERS.

And what we have to do in order to have any semblance of confidence  in investing in the markets is to establish the real capital hit to the banks and insurance groups.  Until that time, how can one invest in the market, any market, with confidence?

That answer:  You can’t!

We need a public sale, even an auction to establish what if anyvalue remains. 

Until that time, it is mere fiat money

Panic Disorder—Behavioral Treatment

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

 

This is generic advice and may not be suitable for you individually.  Please see your health care provider to determine what is best for you.

 

The basic behavioral approach to treat panic disorder from a behaviorist point of view is quite simple and very effective.  In general, having the client “self-monitor” reduces the incidence of panic attacks by approximately 50%.  Here’s how I do it:

 

We start out with having the client keep a “panic log.”  We want to achieve a “baseline” number of panic attacks so that we have a yard stick against which we can measure our progress.  This is observable and enumerable (one can count the number of panic attacks.) and from this initial data, we can compare the results of our interventions. 

 

However, just having the client keep such a log and observe themselves is an intervention in & of itself.  Just from this homework assignment we often see a reduction in the occurrence of panic attacks and the development of insight into managing one’s self in order to diminish the occurrence and severity of panic attacks.

 

The client’s assignment includes keeping specific data about the date and time of each panic attack, logging the antecedents (what occurred just before the onset) and the consequences (what was the resolution), the quality (symptoms) and quantity (duration).  The more details we assign the client to track and write down, the better the results.

 

From this we obtain a baseline, that is, the initial rate of panic attacks prior to beginning treatment.  Remember, exercises in self-observation tend to become interventions in & of themselves.  Therefore, we often see an improvement in the first week; however, sometimes, especially when fueled by personality traits & features, there may be an exacerbation in panic attacks.

 

Furthermore, I also do an intake assessment of what the client has done to do to resolve his or her panic attacks that has not worked and how much caffeine the client ingests.  I have seen a correlation in clinical practice as almost half of my clients who complained of panic attacks had comorbid problems with caffeine. 

 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has much to offer those who suffer from Panic Disorder.  See my earlier blog postings and archived shows.