Posts Tagged ‘American Psychiatric Association’

Diagnostic & Statistical Manual DSM Series Part II ~ The Demise of Care: A Comparison of “Negative Projective Psychology” and “Positive Projective Psychology”

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

 

The current DSM is the DSM IV-TR in which “TR” stands for “Text Revision.”  The most significant change between the DSM IV and the DSM IV-TR is that a new criterion was inserted almost universally into every category of major mental illness:

 

Denial of having a mental disorder or a mental illness became a bonafide criterion for diagnosing the client with mental illness.

 

That may not seem so odd but it is subtle.  Now, if a person claimed they were healthy, that “denial” counted as a mark in the check list finding that person mentally ill!

 

Thus, the entire field of mental health became self-serving and self-centered.  Rather than rely upon the client complaining & requesting our help, we were and are going to find them mentally ill and in need of our services, no matter what.  Whether they need our services or want them, matters not.  All that matters is what we as “experts” say. 

 

Such a move (to the “TR”) further strains credibility and reveals that what passes for mental health treatment today is nothing more than projecting negative diagnoses and labels upon less sophisticated, helpless and vulnerable persons who are unable to defend themselves from the overwhelming onslaught of the “experts,” from the numbers and shear size of the community of mental health treatment providers. 

 

It is a stacked deck against which no one prevails.  While those in cushy positions making larger salaries may think they are helping their fellow man, all they are really doing is helping themselves by riding on the backs of those upon whom they cast their labels, if you will, upon the backs of those upon whom they ‘cast their spells.’

 

Gee, maybe psychology really has become a field dominated by women.  Dare I say witchcraft?  Because

 

most of the professionals I see today, old and young alike, male and female alike, don’t know what they are doing!

 

This is why I call the practice that prevails today “Negative Projective Psychology” and why I have come up with the term “Positive Projective Psychology” to contrast the errors made across the field which cause so many in our country to suffer. 

 

A tell tale sign of negative practice is a practitioner who claims that ‘therapy is “hard” and it is “stressful” for the practitioner.’  Hog wash!  If it is difficult for those practitioners, it is because they have been ill trained, poorly equipped and don’t understand the limitations of natural boundaries & empowering and truly helping their clients!

 

Lastly, “liberal” psychologists should not be treating “conservative” clients!  This is because of the value system impasse.

 

Conservatives understand the true meaning and quest for independence and independent functioning, whereas, liberals caretakers invoke dependency and make their patient’s dependent upon them.  They want them coming back so they can make that payment on their air planes, vacations or extra houses. 

 

Liberals do not want their clients’ getter better and leaving them.  In part, it may be an “abandonment issue” for the practitioner!  But it is mostly about keeping the money flowing. 

 

Such is the fate of an industry controlled by insurance companies and subject to mismanagement of motivation on the part of the professionals!  According to one malpractice attorney with whom I consulted, the insurance companies have tainted it all!  The insurance companies have ruined it all!

 

There is no safe place.

 

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual DSM Series Part I ~ Diminished Salaries & The Demise of the Profession of Psychology

Tuesday, February 10th, 2009

 

By the time the DSM III R was published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 1987, the field of psychology had been on the way to its demise.  Many would argue that with the publication of the DSM III in 1980 the writing was on the wall.  The “political” rivalries that dominated the work conducted by multiple committees were the beginning of the downfall of psychology as the crown of science. 

 

Certainly, the rise of the American Psychological Association (note:  This is a “different” APA than above.) and its encroachment on the credentialing (accreditation) of colleges and university programs in psychology crested during that same time.  It is odd to observe these forces at work at the same time, but the fact is psychology became more politicized and psychiatry overtook psychology during those years as the profession recognized as the leader in mental health treatment.  During that time the pay of the average psychologist diminished greatly.

 

While liberals, especially feminists, blamed the drastic decrease in salaries to male chauvinism and the field becoming recognized as a field dominated by women who we don’t pay as much as men, the sad realities are a bit different.  Certainly, the profession today has more women than men.  Salaries are depressed for all. 

 

Psychiatry achieved dominance by getting their DSM series recognized and adopted by the entire profession, including psychologists and social workers.  Adoption of psychiatry’s DSM was guaranteed when insurance companies began reimbursing services for disorders coded with DSM diagnoses.  Moreover, the DSM series implied the only real treatment for mental disorders was medication, hence, the rise of the hegemony of the Medical Model and the demise of psychology.

 

The second reality was that the field of psychology did not become a field dominated by women as much as it was affected by the law of supply and demand.  Each year during that decade, the schools and universities were pumping out so many graduates that supply exceeded demand.  Under such circumstances, prices fall naturally.  In fact, on average there were 250-400 graduates each year who could not find suitable post doctoral internships in order to obtain licensure!

 

Today, that mismatch continues and it is not advised that anyone enter the field unless they feel a real “calling.”  In fact, one is likely to make more money over one’s lifetime in nursing with an average investment of four (4) years of undergraduate education in comparison to the additional five (5) years of graduate tuition required to achieve a doctorate.  Remember, most people who begin that quest do not finish.